Other Research and Publications

CES Working Paper_EMERGING MOOC MARKETS: Perspectives from India and Bangladesh_Zarif Azhar, Sajid Amit, and Simi Mehta_April 18, 2022:
Under the project “Building Resilient Universities,” CES has developed a MOOC on Promotion of Diversity, Tolerance, and Pluralism. The MOOC market is fast-growing in Bangladesh and already quite large in India. This report looks at the MOOC market in Bangladesh and India in consultation with experts in both countries.

CES White Paper_Secret Sauce_Seeam Noor and Sajid Amit_February 2022:
The goal of this white paper is to explore what leadership at successful startups in Bangladesh have in common. Global academic literature, as well as findings from our expert interviews, indicate that the leadership ability of startup leaders is critical to the success of the startup. In fact, startup leadership could well be considered a valid area of research on its own, among scholars of business and entrepreneurship.

Survey Report_Undergraduate Academic Experience Survey (UAES) 2016-17_Sajid Amit, Ahmed S. Ishtiaque and Adib Sarwar_June 2017:
Presentation Slides

The objective of the Survey has been to assess student satisfaction regarding their undergraduate academic experience, including their perception of academic value, workload, faculty satisfaction, degree curriculum, and academic well-being among many others. Perceptions of a total of 460 respondents were reflected from 5 Private Universities and 2 Public Universities in this report.

Survey Report_Shopper Survey on E-commerce in Bangladesh: Perception, Demand & Usage Trends_Sajid Amit, Ahmed S. Ishtiaque, Abdul Baten and Adib Sarwar_November 2016:
In light of the exciting growth prospects of e-commerce in Bangladesh, the Center for Enterprise & Society (CES) conducted a research study to assess the existing state of perceptions, usage trends, and demand among retail shoppers in Bangladesh. The report also includes strategic recommendations to address e-commerce value chains and business development.

Survey Report_Overcoming Business Challenges in Bangladesh: Findings from a Survey of Firms in the Real Estate, IT and Furniture Industries_Daniel M. Sabet, Ahmed S. Ishtiaque, Mehdi Rajeb and Afsana Tazreen_May 2015:
CES’s flagship research project is based on a survey of 525 businesses, which explores how entrepreneurs are overcoming challenges related to financing, supply chain, human resources, and government. The research asks if entrepreneurs are responding to these challenges by relying on their own entrepreneurial qualities, strengthening their institutions, or by turning to their personal networks. The study goes a step further and asks which of these approaches tends to produce the best results. Contact CES for your free copy.

Next Generation: 2015 and Beyond Report
Next Generation Report Highlights
 – Institute of Informatics and Development (IID) prepared a particular brief based on the study.
The Next Generation research series intends to bring the opinions and perspectives of young people in Bangladesh to the forefront of policy debates. ‘Next Generation Bangladesh 2015 and beyond’ is a follow-on to British Council’s 2010 report and is placed in the context of the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The Next Generation report looks into five important areas affecting young people’s lives – governance, law and order, education and employability, environment, and health. This report was commissioned by the British Council, ActionAid Bangladesh, and the University of Liberal Arts Bangladesh (ULAB). The research was conducted by The Nielsen Company (Bangladesh).

CES Working paper_“Fear Is Not Enough”_Daniel M. Sabet_September 2013:
Abstract: This observational study and survey of pedestrians in Dhaka, Bangladesh asks why more pedestrians do not use pedestrian bridges given the high number of pedestrian fatalities and the dangers of crossing Dhaka’s chaotic streets. Surprisingly, the research finds that individuals who are very worried about being hit by a vehicle or who report actually having been hit are no more likely to use pedestrian footbridges. Instead, the convenience of bridges, the extent to which pedestrians are in a hurry, and the age of respondents offer far better predictors of pedestrian bridge use. The findings point to a need for improved infrastructure, law enforcement, and educational campaigns.

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